Driftwood Magazine Launches – About the Vegan World #Vegan

We’re here to break away from the entry-level content that fills most vegan magazines, the recipes and celebrity lists, and explore what lies beyond the threshold. Each issue of Driftwood will bring you stories of vegan travel adventures, profiles on people, and advancements in our global community.

http://www.driftwoodmag.com/

http://www.driftwoodmag.com/  Go here to see more, get the newsletter and subscribe…

Food as Medicine: Preventing and Treating the Most Dreaded Diseases with Diet #Vegan

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Dr. Greger has scoured the world’s scholarly literature on clinical nutrition and developed this new presentation based on the latest in cutting-edge research exploring the role diet may play in preventing, arresting, and even reversing some of our most feared causes of death and disability.

This is such good information, thank you Dr.Greger

http://nutritionfacts.org/video/food-as-medicine/  Click here to watch this very informative video

Meat Climate Change #Vegan

This Forthcoming Book is Crowdfunding Now!

Meat Climate Change

The 2nd Leading Cause of Global Warming

by Dr. Moses Seenarine


To stop global warming and preserve a future for children, we must reduce the burning of fossil fuels, as well as greenhouse gas emissions released from the production and consumption of animal products. 


HIGHLIGHTS

  • Demand for animal products is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2013 to 2025.
  • Even if the world went fossil free by 2100, increasing animal consumption will continue to cause catastrophic global warming.
  • A guidebook to climate science and dietary change, and related environmental, social and psychological issues. It examines the impacts of climate change and diet on the poor, water, forests, soil, oceans, biodiversity and health.
  • The book covers a wide range of disciplines, and includes analysis from hundreds of primary research studies. The book provides an excellent background on climate literacy, and great insights into climate politics. Importantly, it explores near term climate change scenarios to the year 2100, and necessary personal, social and policy changes.
  • This book would be useful to anyone interested in learning about climate change, the environment, diet and health, social inequality, and animal-based agribusiness. It is addressed to the general public, educators, social and environmental activists, climate scientists and policy-makers.

http://meatclimatechange.org/

12 Reasons Why Going Vegan Is The Best Way to Solve California (and The World’s) Drought #Vegan

With California’s drought reaching near-crisis proportions, Gov. Jerry Brown has ordered mandatory water use reductions for the first time in history. Here’s a look at 12 reasons from the documentary Cowspiracy why the best way to solve drought problems worldwide is by going vegan.

1. There are 7 billion people on the planet and 70 billion animals used for food.

Population Boom

2. Here’s how much food and water 7 billion humans consume, compared to just 1.5 billion cows.


Cowspiracy

Humans: 5.2 billion gallons of water and 21 billion pounds of food Cows: 45 billion gallons of water and 135 billion pounds of food

Click here for the full story

Top 5 Misconceptions About Food: A Doctor’s Daily Experience #Vegan

BY MICHELLE MCMACKEN, MD

As a primary care doctor, I spend my days taking care of patients with diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, and obesity. I also see “healthy” patients whose eating habits are starting them on the road to a future filled with doctor’s appointments and hospital visits.

I enjoy reminding my patients that their fork can be more powerful than my prescription pad when it comes to preventing and reversing chronic diseases. This conversation usually uncovers some common misconceptions about food and nutrition. Here are five myths that I hear almost every day, among patients and colleagues alike:

1. “I need to eat more protein.”

Many people don’t realize that the average American consumes more than twice the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of protein, most of it from animal products.1,2 Unfortunately, animal-based proteins have been shown to promote faster growth, not only of normal cells but of cancer cells, and have been linked to a variety of cancers as well as heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and kidney stones.3,4

Plant foods contain plenty of protein, and a whole-foods, plant-based diet actually provides exactly what’s recommended in terms of protein requirements – about 8-10% of total daily calories from protein.  This happens naturally when people eat a diet of diverse, whole plant foods – there is no need to count grams of protein!  And unlike animal proteins, plant proteins from whole foods are not associated with cancer or other chronic diseases.  In fact, these foods actually prevent many of the diseases we see today!

2. “I need to drink milk to have strong bones.”

Many people equate dairy with calcium, strong bones, and the prevention of osteoporosis (low bone density). Generations of advertising slogans have perpetuated this idea. However, dairy isn’t the answer here. Studies show that dairy products may actually increase the risk of fractures related to osteoporosis!5-7

The biological purpose of cow’s milk is to support the rapid growth of a calf. Humans have no nutritional or medical need to consume the milk of cows or any other nonhuman species. Cow’s milk has significant levels of female hormones, and usually contains antibiotics, pesticides, saturated fat, and cholesterol — substances that definitely do NOT do a body good! Dairy has been specifically linked with prostate, ovarian, and uterine cancer, as well as heart disease and early death.7-13

The best sources of calcium come from the earth, in foods such as kale, broccoli, bok choy, and Brussels sprouts. As a bonus, these vegetables are high in vitamin K, which is also important for strong bones. Beans may be an especially good source of calcium, because they are also high in phytates, antioxidant compounds that may enhance mineral absorption14 (despite common perception to the contrary) and thus protect bone density.15 Many brands of soy milk, almond milk, orange juice, and tofu are fortified with calcium and vitamin D, just as cow’s milk is artificially fortified with these nutrients. However, there is no need to specifically target calcium sources in the diet; a diverse, whole-foods, plant-based diet will provide all of the calcium you need.

3. “Chicken, turkey, fish, and eggs are healthy sources of protein.”

Chicken, turkey, fish, and eggs contain significant amounts of cholesterol and saturated fat, in many cases as much as beef,16 so they are not “heart healthy” foods. Plant-based sources of protein contain zero cholesterol and far less saturated fat. Chicken and turkey usually contain antibiotics, pesticides, and fecal contaminants, and have been associated with salmonella, staph, and other infectious disease outbreaks. Chicken, fish, and eggs have been associated with an increased risk of diabetes.17-25Almost all fish contain mercury, which can cause neurologic and cognitive problems; many also contain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a toxin associated with cancer.16And a recent study showed that eggs cause intestinal bacteria to make a substance called TMAO, which can trigger heart attacks and other cardiovascular events.26

Whole plant foods supply plenty of protein, and they don’t come packaged with cholesterol or high levels of saturated fat. Instead, their protein is bundled with fiber and many necessary nutrients! Great plant-based sources of protein include lentils, chickpeas, black beans, kidney beans, soybeans, and quinoa. Green vegetables such as spinach, collards, broccoli, and peas are also quite high in protein per calorie. But remember, it’s not necessary to seek out plant foods high in protein, since a varied whole-food, plant-based diet will naturally provide enough protein, without special effort.27

4. “I can’t eat carbs.”

Many people are mistakenly led to believe they should avoid carbohydrates, particularly for weight management and diabetes control. Instead, they focus on proteins — especially animal proteins — and fats. Sadly, this approach actually increases the risk of chronic disease and death,28-32 and it deprives people of the numerous nutrients found in carbohydrate-containing foods.

It is true, however, that not all carbohydrates are created equal. Refined, highly processed carbohydrates can raise triglycerides, promote weight gain, and drive up blood sugar. On the other hand, starches that come from whole grains bring fiber, essential fatty acids, B vitamins, zinc, and protein into our diets and provide an excellent source of energy. Beans, legumes, starchy vegetables, and fruits are other healthy carbohydrate sources. Balancing these foods with non-starchy vegetables is an optimal way to eat for weight loss, diabetes control, and reversal of heart disease.

5. “Healthy food is too expensive.”

You don’t need to shop at a gourmet health food store to find nutritious foods. Actually, some of the healthiest foods are the least expensive, and they are readily available at most grocery stores and many local farmers’ markets. Beans, lentils, brown rice, and frozen vegetables are usually inexpensive, especially when bought dried and in bulk. (Organic fruits and vegetables can cost more, but eating nonorganic plant-based foods is still more nutritious than eating meat, chicken, fish, eggs, and dairy, organic or otherwise.)

Even when processed foods and animal products are sold cheaply, they are expensive in terms of the cost to your health. What you may save now, you could end up spending later in pharmacy co-payments and medical bills!

http://www.forksoverknives.com/top-5-misconceptions-food-doctors-daily-experience/

Dan Buettner talks about his followup book to The Blue Zones, Blue Zones Solution #Vegan

Published on Apr 6, 2015

http://drmcdougall.com
Dan Buettner was a recent guest speaker at the McDougall Advanced Study Weekend in Santa Rosa, CA. You can learn more athttp://www.bluezones.com. Dan is a National Geographic Fellow and New York Times best selling author. His New York Times Sunday Magazine article, “The Island Where People Forget to Die,” was the second most popular article of 2012. He founded Blue Zones®, a company that puts the world’s best practices in longevity and well-being to work in people’s lives. Buettner’s National Geographic cover story on longevity, “The Secrets of Living Longer,” was one of their top-selling issues in history and made him a finalist for a National Magazine Award. His books The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer from the People Who’ve Lived the Longest (2008) and Thrive: Finding Happiness the Blue Zones Way (2010) appeared on many bestseller lists and were both featured on Oprah. His forthcoming book, THE BLUE ZONES SOLUTION: Eating and Living Like the World’s Healthiest People, will be published by National Geographic in April 2015. In 2009, Dan Buettner and his partner, AARP, applied principles of The Blue Zones to Albert Lea, Minnesota and successfully raised life expectancy and lowered health care costs by some 40%. Since then, he has teamed with Healthways to implementthe program in 16 other cities in America and has dramatically improved the health of more than 5 million Americans to-date. Their strategy focuses on optimizing the health environment instead of individual behavior change. Writing in Newsweek, Harvard University’s Walter Willet called the results “stunning.” Dan also holds three world records in distance cycling and has won an Emmy Award for television production.

YouTube Video Interview – Well worth watching:

Vegan diet best for planet as reported by The Hill #Vegan

A federal panel that helps set federal dietary guidelines is recommending Americans eat less meat because it’s better for the environment, sparking outrage from industry groups representing the nation’s purveyors of beef, pork and poultry.

The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, a federally appointed panel of nutritionists created in 1983, decided for the first time this year to factor in environmental sustainability in its recommendations. They include a finding that a diet lower in animal-based foods is not only healthier, but has less of an environmental impact.

The meat industry is lashing back, contending the panel has neither the authority nor the expertise to make such a judgment.

The gist of the article:

In its review of scientific studies, the committee highlighted research concluding that a vegan diet had the most potential health benefits.

“The organically grown vegan diet also had the lowest estimated impact on resources and ecosystem quality, and the average Italian diet had the greatest projected impact,” according to the report. “Beef was the single food with the greatest projected impact on the environment; other foods estimated to have high impact included cheese, milk, and seafood.”

The committee’s report says people should eat less red and processed meat because it contains saturated fats, which when over-consumed can lead to cardiovascular disease, and instead recommends Americans eat more vegetables and nuts.

The full story…
 

 

101 Leading Vegan Websites for Healthy Living #Vegan

Holistic nutrition is all about getting the perfect blend of nutrients from healthy sources while avoiding foods with toxic additives and excess amounts of particular chemicals. Opting for a vegan diet is one way that many people transition to overall healthier eating, and it’s a great way to eliminate some of the most common unhealthy eating habits. Veganism is often chosen for moral reasons as well, but for anyone who wants to develop more holistically nutritious eating habits, the health benefits of avoiding animal products like meat and milk are a great incentive to give the vegan lifestyle a shot. Some of the awesome benefits of going vegan include:

  • Reducing consumption of animal growth hormones and other chemicals.
  • Increased intake of fiber and assorted nutrients found in vegetables.
  • Lowered intake of excess sugar, salt, and fat typically found in processed meats, cheeses, and other animal products.

To see top 101 sites click the link below:

http://holisticnutritiondegree.org/vegan/

VEGAN Everyday Stories… A Movie in the Making

Vegan Everyday Stories…

Vegan is a feature-length documentary exploring the widespread rise of veganism in mainstream culture. The movie takes a fascinating, in-depth look at how everyday people follow a vegan lifestyle while interweaving renowned expert interviews and heartfelt community stories.

We are looking for stories to feature in the movie! If you or someone you know has a story to share, please tell us about it.

Please help us create this movie by making a tax-deductible donation!

Click here for the Website http://veganmovie.org/

Northwest VEG